jqeury.org

This domain has expired. Is this your domain?
Renew Now!

Aug 262013
 

Recipes With Honey – For All Seasons

Recipes With Honey - For All Seasons

HONEY CAN be used in everything! Examples found in this cookbook include Honey Glazed Ham, Baby Carrots, French Bread, Brie Cheese Smothered in Almonds, Blueberry Scones, Tomato-Basil Soup, Sweet Potato Biscuits, Veggie Pasta Salad, Honey Glazed Fruit Salad, Honey Wheat Knots, Honey Nut Snack Mix, and a whole lot more!

I hope you and your family delight in the Gourmet Country Cuisine featured in this book of OVER 50 of my personal recipes with honey that I’ve compiled over the years!

Price:

Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking

Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking

Americans have fallen in love with Italian regional food, from the casual fare of Tuscan trattorias to the more refined creations of high-end Piedmontese restaurants, from Sicily’s wonderful desserts to Emilia-Romagna’s superb cheeses and cured meats. Rustico is the first American book to explore the remarkable breadth of these richly varied cuisines, devoting equal attention to each of Italy’s twenty regions. This includes thorough treatment of such places as Val d’Aosta, high in the A

List Price: $ 35.00

Price: $ 49.95

  6 Responses to “Recipes With Honey – For All Seasons”

  1. 11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    great results so far!, August 28, 2012
    By 
    Jo D.

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Recipes With Honey – For All Seasons (Kindle Edition)

    If all the recipes are as wonderful as the French bread and Bbq sauce recipes I’ve tried so far than this book is a winner! Not just for all seasons but for all occasions from a casual Sunday Football party to an elegant Holiday Party and everything in between. The French Bread with some Honey Cinnamon Butter* is to die for and smells so good! I can’t wait to make French Toast with this bread. Or I will if there is any left in the morning! Trust me make two loaves!

    * Cinnamon Honey Butter is not in this book. Its easy to make. Equal parts of Honey and softened butter whipped together with a little cinnamon to taste. I usually do 8 oz of each ( 1/2cup) honey and butter with 1 tsp cinnamon or allspice.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. 7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Honey is not just for dessert any more, August 31, 2012
    By 
    Penmouse
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Recipes With Honey – For All Seasons (Kindle Edition)

    Honey is not just for dessert any more after author Diana Bricker offers up a wide variety of honey-based recipes ranging from main dishes to desserts. Some of the recipes you will find in this sweet cookbook include:

    Brie Cheese Smothered in Almonds and Honey
    Honey Glazed Ham
    Layered Vegetable Salad
    Honey Glazed Carrots
    Honey Mustard Chicken Salad Wraps
    Ice Box Coleslaw
    Honey Nut Snack Mix
    Old-Fashioned Cornbread
    Pumpkin Spice Trifle
    Fresh Fruit Tray with a Lemon Yogurt Honey Creme
    White Chocolate-Macadamia Nut Brownies

    Recommend.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. 2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    How Could You Go Wrong Cooking With Honey, December 20, 2012
    By 
    Christophe Panetier “Panetier” (San Ramon, CA USA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Recipes With Honey – For All Seasons (Kindle Edition)

    This is a wonderful addition to my digital cookbooks. It gives good reasons to use honey instead of other sweeteners, and it offers some creative desserts and dishes. I recommend it.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  4. 20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Rustico, a look at Italian cooking and regional living, October 22, 2002
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking (Hardcover)

    Rustico is one of the few cookbooks I have actually sat down with a cup of coffee and read pretty much cover to cover. I felt as though Ms. Negrin was sitting across the table from me narrating a story. She has the unique talent of personable writing that comes across in her anecdotes relating to every region she visited. I trust her extensive knowlege of regional cooking, and feel transported from place to place as the book tells the tales of so many aspects of cooking and living in such different areas of Italy.
    From the delicious braised venison with creamy grappa sauce of Val d’Aosta, to the beet-filled ravioli with poppy seeds of the Veneto, to the mint and lemon laced cheese pillows in chestnut honey of Sardinia, this book hands us traditional recipes only someone with uneditied access to kitchens in the homes of Italians of every region could gather.
    The book’s beautiful photography of both inspiring dishes as well as day to day living in Italy convey a sort of warmth and familiarity reminiscent of Ms. Negrin’s writing.
    I highly recommend the book to anyone looking to discover the legacy of regional Italian cooking.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  5. 15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Good introduction to Italian Regional Food. Great Read., November 28, 2004
    By 
    B. Marold “Bruce W. Marold” (Bethlehem, PA United States) –
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking (Hardcover)

    `Rustico’ by Italian food journalist Micol Negrin is a better than average book of regional Italian recipes in a world filled with good books on regional Italian recipes. The book’s subtitle specifies that the book concentrates on `Country’ cooking. And, although the book is very nicely done by region, it has no pretensions to being a scholarly work such as Waverley Root’s `The Foods of Italy’ or even a journalistic coverage of the subject as in Claudia Roden’s very worthy `The Food of Italy’. In fact, the absence of pretension adds to the pleasant satisfaction one gets in reading the book, as it is not without merit as an introduction to the culinary world of Italy.

    In my mind, the book is immediately superior to Susan Herrmann Loomis’ very good book `Italian Farmhouse Cookbook’ in that it does deal with recipes by region with an introduction that explains the geographical, historical, and climactic reasons for the prevailing cuisine in each region. Rome (Latium), for example, is all about sheep (as the city was founded by a tribe of nomadic sheepherders) and pigs (since from the time of the Roman Empire, the city of Rome was the center of hog butchering for the region. Similarly, Genoa and its region, Liguria, is shown to have a cuisine which is very similar to southern Italy due to the role of Genoa as a major medieval port and source of imported foods.

    In addition to recipes and culinary history, the book gives an excellent overview of the wines and cheeses of each region. The coverage of cheeses is especially interesting to someone who knows a lot more about cheeses and the differences between cows and sheep than he does about grapes. The book makes clear, for example, why a cheese like Fontina is a distinctive product of the alpine region of Val d’Aosta, tucked in the seam between France and German speaking Switzerland. Good Italian Fontina is a great cross between the semihard Swiss Gruyeres and Emmentalers and the soft French bries. The book also gives some sidebar coverage to the types of breads native to the regions. These comments are a bit frustrating, as it seems it would have been almost as easy to give us the recipe for Grissini (Piedmontese breadsticks) as to tell us the historical origin of these little lovelies. But, bread is a very big subject and Carol Field’s superb `The Italian Baker’ has five pages devoted to Grissini recipes.

    All of Negrin’s other virtues would still leave us with a rather thin book if she had chosen to give us recipes for the well-known specialities of each region. Another book with spaghetti Carbonara, artichokes ala Judica, saltimbocca, and potato gnocchi in the chapter on Latium would have been very dull indeed, as these four recipes show up in every book I have seen on the cooking of Rome, and there are many of these books already available. Some well-known regional classics are here, such as Campania’s (Naples) Pizza Margherita and Venice’s Risi e Bisi (rice and peas), but many of the dishes are not only unfamiliar, but break some rules I learned at Mario Batali’s knee, such as the fact that cooks in Campania, Sicily, and Sardinia have no qualms about combining fish and cheese, although the excellent recipe to which this observation is a headnote combines a very mild cheese, Mozzarella, with a very strong tasting fish, salted anchovies. In any case, this recipe is a great variation on the quick Spaghetti Puttanesca style of dish.

    The selection of dishes in the book as a whole is a very nice mix of pasta, breads, soups, braises, salads, roasts and frys. As the book is organized by geography rather than by course or type of dish, a supplementary table of contents organizing all dishes by type of dish would have been a very nice addition. This is not a book from which you will want to learn how to make bread or pasta. For those, I suggest you go to Carol Field and Marcella Hazan respectively, but the bread and pizza recipes in this book are pretty good. It’s just that if things don’t work out, you have no guidance on how to correct your mistakes.

    The recipes end with an excellent little chapter on basic Italian recipes for broths, sauces and doughs. The veggies in the chicken broth are cooked a bit too long for my taste. I am pretty sure you have sucked all the goodness out of your carrots, celery, and onions in three hours, so why go stew them for six. The book ends with a very nice list of American sources, most of which are located in New York City.

    The introduction to each region includes the addresses of restaurants, shops, and culinary schools in that region. If you are a foodie and are planning a trip to Italy, this information can be invaluable. Even if you simply want to access these establishments over the phone and can trust your Italian, this is useful, as telephone numbers for each establishment are given. No web sites, unfortunately.

    I notice that almost all acknowledgments…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  6. 7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Rustico cooking is a delight!, October 22, 2002
    By 
    Jennifer Iserloh (New York, NY USA) –

    This review is from: Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking (Hardcover)

    Micol Negrin’s wonderful new creation “Rustico: Regional Italian Country Cooking” has two qualities that set it apart from other cookbooks that I’ve used. The first and most important is the way recipes are showcased. The recipes are so well written and focused that any cook from novice to chef can appreciate the way ingredients come together in each dish. Some of the recipes are basic favorites while others are unusual, tempting, and inventive. The added cultural notes, cooking tips, and gorgeous photography really shows the cultural importance and deep connect to food that the author has experienced in her travels.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>