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Dec 042014
 

Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures

Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures

  • Maximum versatility: Great pictures in sunlight or low light, in action or still. The world’s most versatile 400-speed film choice.
  • Improved color reproduction: Bright, vibrant prints & Consistent color under most lighting conditions.
  • Optimized skin tones: Pleasing, natural-looking “people pictures”.

Clear, vibrant pictures with ISO 400-speed color print films. Excellent sharpness and fine grain provide high quality pictures that you’ll be proud to share with others, even when enlarged. Designed for exposure with daylight or electronic flash, you can also obtain pleasing results under most existing-light conditions without filters. Its proprietary technology delivers the world’s most convenient 400-speed film, so you can capture more of your precious moments. Whether your subjects are still

List Price: $ 0.25

Price: $ 0.25

Film: A Critical Introduction (3rd Edition)

Film: A Critical Introduction (3rd Edition)

Film: A Critical Introduction provides readers with the skills needed to successfully critique and analyze film and teaches  strategies for translating ideas about film into written criticism and analysis. Intricate discussions of the current issues in film theory, from sound production to documentaries, keep readers’ perspectives on film fresh and informed. Part I introduces readers to the importance of film analysis, offering helpful strategies for discerning the way films produce meaning.

List Price: $ 142.00

Price: $ 74.99

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  6 Responses to “Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures”

  1. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    35mm film, March 9, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures (Electronics)

    It’s film, really not much more needs to be said about it. Believe this stuff is now made in Mexico. Had to order $25 or more of additional products in order to qualify for free shipping for this item and also there is an order limit of 5 rolls per order maximum.

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  2. 3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Always the best, April 12, 2013
    By 
    AnnGP

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures (Electronics)

    I have been using Kodak film for well over 30 years. Always the best. Sorry the company became a mess.

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  3. 4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    great find, March 5, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kodak 603 4029 Ultramax 400 Color Negative Film (ISO 400) 35mm 24-Exposures (Electronics)

    Film is so hard to find these days. I am glad i found this deal. Good deal at a good price.

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  4. 7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Fabulous introduction!, January 18, 2006
    By 
    Q (The Continuum) –

    This is not only the best introduction to film studies that I’ve found, it’s also a model of how a textbook should be organized and written. After an opening chapter on plot structure and thematic analysis, it goes in-depth into the elements of film form, with chapters on narrative form, mise en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound. The final section includes chapters on documentary and avant-garde film, writing about film, social context, ideology, stardom, genre, film authorship, and the economics of the film industry. Everything is covered very in-depth and in detail, with lots of excellent examples and photos. There is also a helpful film glossary in back. The writing is model of clarity and organization. This textbook is notable for the way that writing instruction is integrated into the text. Each chapter concludes with brief essay which exemplifies the concepts and terms used in the chapter, and includes margin notes which discuss the formal and rhetorical features of a college essay, including organization, research, thesis statement, and so on. There is also a concise chapter devoted entirely to writing about film, including the different kinds of essays typically assigned by professors. Students who read carefully will be well prepared to write film analysis papers for their college classes. Since this is an introductory text, it doesn’t try to give complete coverage to film history and film theory, although these topics are introduced. Film history and theory really need to be covered in separate books and classes, as the authors recognize.

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  5. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great Book!, July 9, 2009
    By 
    Serenity (Toledo, OH) –

    This was the required textbook for my Intro to Film class, and I actually ENJOYED reading the book. I found myself immersed in the book! It’s easy to read, and filled with interesting information! They have a range of examples they use covering all genres and movies from all different times, so anyone can relate to them! I highly recommend this book!!

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  6. 9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Superior, Well-Developed, Introductory Text . . ., January 28, 2007
    By 
    Erica J. Dymond (Bethlehem, PA USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Whether you are a student or professor, there are a wide range of introductory film texts from which to choose — it can be a bit overwhelming and a mistake is costly! This is especially true if you are the professor who is selecting an expensive text for your students (and they are all expensive) . . . you want provide them with a text worthy of the expense AND you do not want to invest additional hours photocopying material from other texts to compensate for less-than-fantastic chapters.

    With this in mind, allow me to say that Pramaggoire and Wallis’ text is the best I have ever encountered . . . bar none. I have used this text for over a year now, and the response has been extremely positive. It may initially seem irrelevant, but this text is extraordinary aesthetically appealing. Why is this important? Because we are talking about professors and students who have an interest in a VISUAL art. This text presents large, lush examples to compliment the text: not all texts invest this effort or expense. Moreover, the selected examples are spot-on . . . they are not randomly chosen BUT are the quintessential example of any given technique.

    What makes this text great is both the organization (which others have mentioned) and the accessibility. Let’s say you are not taking a formal class in film, you would have no problem reading this text solo. It is that understandable . . . and, let’s face it, if an author cannot clearly explain an idea to a lay-person then he/she really do not know the subject. Pramaggoire and Wallis KNOW their subject.

    And while there are several “well-written” texts on the market, not all incorporate contemporary examples. While Orson Wells and Ingmar Bergman are key to understanding film, one cannot successful base an introductory text on “The Greats.” It simply does not engage the new student. Luckily, this text includes essential examples from film history as well as contemporary examples (like “Super Size Me,” “Waking Life,” “The Piano” and “Requiem for a Dream”). I am especially fond of the short analysis of Harron’s “American Psycho” (an oft overlooked, cinematic masterpiece).

    One final reason to select this text: while other writers are rehashing old critical approaches to film, Pramaggoire and Wallis select the most relevant and contemporary ones. They instruct readers on how to view a film in the context of race, gender, sexuality, class, and national identity: all of which are crucial to understanding film! Likewise, they address “film authorship” which is equally as valuable. The text is never bogged-down by jargon (many are) . . . nor is it heavy-handed in its approach. Unlike most texts, this one wants to be understood.

    You will find texts with DVD-ROMs, texts with “writing” supplements, texts with online-course access, and other “bells and whistles” . . . but this text does not NEED any of that. (It seems the others are trying to compensate for their short-comings by including “bonus” material . . . but it just becomes MESSY!). I plan to continue using this text as a tool for teaching film . . . it is, BY FAR, the best on the market. It is “smart,” beautiful, and completely accessible. Whether you are a professor seeking a new text or a lay-person looking to enhance your knowledge of film, you cannot go wrong with this work. Trust me, it is worth the price!!

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