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Sep 252014
 

Cooking from Mainland China [Hardcover Book] [VHS]

Cooking from Mainland China [Hardcover Book] [VHS]

List Price: $ 67.43

Price: $ 67.43

Regional Foods of Northern Italy: Recipes and Remembrances

Regional Foods of Northern Italy: Recipes and Remembrances

This is a cookbook like no other. It evokes the essence of Northern Italy’s traditional foods in a beautifully wrought amalgam of recipe and narrative. It beckons you across the wet stone of Venice’s Rialto bridge into a candlelit fifteenth-century cantina. It invites you down a forest road in Umbria, where grappa-fortified fishermen toss trout onto a wood fire and stage a sunset feast. It proffers nearly two hundred recipes from the heart and soul of Italy’s North, including:

• Risotto

List Price: $ 18.00

Price: $ 73.37

  3 Responses to “Cooking from Mainland China [Hardcover Book] [VHS]”

  1. 26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    DESERVES TO BE IN THE KITCHEN OF EVERY SERIOUS COOK, July 20, 2000

    As I write this review, the book is out-of-stock. I want to share this book with everyone, so I am hoping that my review will change things around. First of all, the recipes in this book are complex — but — there are books that are much more challenging. Haute Mexican and Japanese cuisine are more difficult, the first because it grew out of a class culture where the food was cooked by maids the second because it is so unlike western food. There are things in this book that are exotic, even to Bostonians where “the Italian North End” was made such an imprint on the city. There is a pasta based on yeast raised dough that is wonderful on a winter’s night when snow is falling. There are superb chicken dishes and magnificent desserts. This one of only two cookbooks that I have wanted to go through, page by page, recipe by recipe, and cook everything.

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  2. 10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    BEAUTY! LOVE! george’s creed in a nutshell, August 17, 2008
    By 
    G “G” (LA) –

    This review is from: Regional Foods of Northern Italy: Recipes and Remembrances (Paperback)

    You have been told you need the other “classic” Italian cookbooks like Marcella Hazan. You dabble in others like Lydia Bastianich. You collect cookbooks on certain favored regions like Rome. But really, there is nothing like this book by Marlena de Blasi, and her companion book on the foods of Southern Italy. There is an incredible beauty to the recipes, the selections, and the way in which the author weaves the food into narratives and stories about travel through Italy. Her recipes for many, many braised meat dishes are constants on my table. Every five to ten pages, I find a recipe that changes the way I cook and eat. I spend much time just reading the narratives, which I never do with other cookbooks. I have dog-eared and folded over the corners of pages for recipes that I hope to cook soon — there are years of joy to be made between these cover — recipes that I have made, recipes that I will make. Places that I will want to visit. All of that. Between these two books, I have been celebrating dinner parties with friends for years. I just adore these books, love them, and wish more and more people would realize what treasures they are.

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  3. 12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    A good effort, but too lost in the romance of the place, April 30, 2006
    By 
    Brian Connors (Yarmouth, MA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Regional Foods of Northern Italy: Recipes and Remembrances (Paperback)

    I like the recipes in this book. They give a nice cross-section of Northern Italian cooking, and are picked as much for being interesting as typical. Also, the stories and remniscences are those of a first-rate memoirist. The problem is that the two of them combined together make for a somewhat overly flowery reading.

    I struggled with the star rating on this one — it really is a worthwhile book to have, but it has serious flaws, the most glaring being the deliberate omissions of the regions of Trentino-Alto Adige and Liguria; the author’s logic is that Trentino food is largely Austrian and that of Liguria more southern Italian in style, not helping the reader to know northern Italy, but that seems to me to be an overly romantic way of looking at it. I don’t really like it when cookbook authors pare down their work for reasons of accessibility or percieved consistency, because the book loses a segment of the whole picture.

    It’s a pity, really, because it probably is one of the better books for understanding the food of northern Italy. The flowery tone of the book that I do not particularly enjoy actually does appeal to some, and the personal stories do give a context to the book that more technical cookbooks lack. If it was a more expensive book, I probably wouldn’t recommend it, but it’s a little like the idea of a film reviewer saying “wait for the DVD” — it’s not that pricey, so grab a copy and see what you think. (And I do like the Modenese pancetta-and-egg scramble in the book — very tasty.)

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